tonite @ adhoc pad
Das FeierAbendBier ist so und so ein guter Grund sich mit uns an den Tisch zu setzen, oder an die Bar. Wer Lust hat auf unkompliziertes Netzwerken und Fachgesimpel ist herzlich eingeladen!

Morgen gibt es aber zusätzlich ein kleines Highlight: die Mardivale Dunny Serie ist endlich da, und wir laden am 11.April zu einer kleinen Runde der Art-Toy-Sammler und Fans!
Unbedingt doppelte oder ungeliebte Toys mitnehmen, wir nutzen die Gelegenheit für eine Trading Party!

Veranstaltungsort: · Werkstatt · Grafikdesign
Kienmayergasse 22, 1140 Bécs, Austria

tonite @ adhoc pad Das FeierAbendBier ist so und so ein guter Grund sich mit uns an den Tisch zu setzen, oder an die Bar. Wer Lust hat auf unkompliziertes Netzwerken und Fachgesimpel ist herzlich eingeladen!

Morgen gibt es aber zusätzlich ein kleines Highlight: die Mardivale Dunny Serie ist endlich da, und wir laden am 11.April zu einer kleinen Runde der Art-Toy-Sammler und Fans! Unbedingt doppelte oder ungeliebte Toys mitnehmen, wir nutzen die Gelegenheit für eine Trading Party!

Veranstaltungsort: · Werkstatt · Grafikdesign Kienmayergasse 22, 1140 Bécs, Austria

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm

mattiassnygg:

The palmnut vulture.

via septagonstudios

runningpencils asked: Hello Mattias, I love your work! I found your tumblr just now and saw the “ask me anything” sign in bright purple, so I can assume you would enjoy a little question. You have a detail level control which is admirable, and also color and composition are very lovely. Each image is easy to understand yet loaded of interesting notes. Do you have an intelligible process that you could share? many thanks.

Answer:
Hey! That’s a good question and one that’s not very easy to answer :) Here’s an approximation: 
1. Use the largest possible brush to build up the whole image to a rough state. 2. Select ONE spot where you want to focus the image. 3. Add detail to only that particular area (sticking to this is the hard part). 4. If something doesn’t look or feel right, repeat from step 1.
I don’t always manage to stick to a process, the x factor is huge on why sometimes it works and other times things crash and burn. Hope this helps!
— 2 weeks ago with 1 note

mattiassnygg:

The palmnut vulture.

via septagonstudios

runningpencils asked: Hello Mattias, I love your work! I found your tumblr just now and saw the “ask me anything” sign in bright purple, so I can assume you would enjoy a little question. You have a detail level control which is admirable, and also color and composition are very lovely. Each image is easy to understand yet loaded of interesting notes. Do you have an intelligible process that you could share? many thanks.

Answer: Hey! That’s a good question and one that’s not very easy to answer :) Here’s an approximation: 1. Use the largest possible brush to build up the whole image to a rough state. 2. Select ONE spot where you want to focus the image. 3. Add detail to only that particular area (sticking to this is the hard part). 4. If something doesn’t look or feel right, repeat from step 1. I don’t always manage to stick to a process, the x factor is huge on why sometimes it works and other times things crash and burn. Hope this helps! — 2 weeks ago with 1 note