a comment on leif peng s todaysinspiration.com blog on robert fawcett. i found that rather interesting as it points out general points that should be observed in composition or  setting up scenes. to make most of it check with the article it is commenting on.http://todaysinspiration.blogspot.co.at/2011/02/robert-fawcett-abstract-artist.html

Here are a few of my personal observations regarding Robert Fawcett’s illustrative work, from my own in depth study of his magnificent artwork.
1. First and foremost the word work after the word art, artwork, is just that. So put the effort in   and someday you yourself, will have a work of art.
2. Abstract units seen as shapes.
3. Look for hooks on the line and along side of the line.
4. Catch the flow of the circles in motion.
5. Negative space is a shape.
6. Quick placement by use of darks - they act as beats to a rhythm.
7. Shapes play off of other shapes.
8. There is character in shapes - yes shapes do talk.
9. Step directionals throughout - see the darks first.
10. Accent darks act as measurements -watch the blacks.
11. Story, draw back from it, draw to where it’s told.
12. It’s not so much where she’s looking, but how she’s looking, and the intent she’s looking   with, as she looks in the direction she’s looking. Her look in itself is part of the story.
13. See lines through on the basis of shapes - see the invisible sight lines in every picture - x-ray like.
14. Notice how the small blacks, pull and balance the larger blacks.
15. Orderly shapes and diagonals out of chaos - Strip it down to the bare essentials.
16. A stepped approach = rhythm - look for echoes.
17. Key center point - invisible perspective point - radiation points.
18. Pictures are doorways to the soul.
19. A complicated pose reduced to a quick notation = speed of result.
20. Talking points that tell the story like a picture puzzle.

That’s more than enough to get you thinking when you next view a Robert Fawcett work of art. The more you look into what he’s done with his presentations the more you will appreciate why he’s called ‘the illustrator’s illustrator.’
Randy Ranson

a comment on leif peng s todaysinspiration.com blog on robert fawcett. i found that rather interesting as it points out general points that should be observed in composition or setting up scenes. to make most of it check with the article it is commenting on.
http://todaysinspiration.blogspot.co.at/2011/02/robert-fawcett-abstract-artist.html

Here are a few of my personal observations regarding Robert Fawcett’s illustrative work, from my own in depth study of his magnificent artwork.
1. First and foremost the word work after the word art, artwork, is just that. So put the effort in and someday you yourself, will have a work of art.
2. Abstract units seen as shapes.
3. Look for hooks on the line and along side of the line.
4. Catch the flow of the circles in motion.
5. Negative space is a shape.
6. Quick placement by use of darks - they act as beats to a rhythm.
7. Shapes play off of other shapes.
8. There is character in shapes - yes shapes do talk.
9. Step directionals throughout - see the darks first.
10. Accent darks act as measurements -watch the blacks.
11. Story, draw back from it, draw to where it’s told.
12. It’s not so much where she’s looking, but how she’s looking, and the intent she’s looking with, as she looks in the direction she’s looking. Her look in itself is part of the story.
13. See lines through on the basis of shapes - see the invisible sight lines in every picture - x-ray like.
14. Notice how the small blacks, pull and balance the larger blacks.
15. Orderly shapes and diagonals out of chaos - Strip it down to the bare essentials.
16. A stepped approach = rhythm - look for echoes.
17. Key center point - invisible perspective point - radiation points.
18. Pictures are doorways to the soul.
19. A complicated pose reduced to a quick notation = speed of result.
20. Talking points that tell the story like a picture puzzle.

That’s more than enough to get you thinking when you next view a Robert Fawcett work of art. The more you look into what he’s done with his presentations the more you will appreciate why he’s called ‘the illustrator’s illustrator.’ Randy Ranson

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